BATTLE OF SOULS
Card Game by NLG

Official Rule Book v 1.3


 

Table of Contents

RULE UPDATES. 3

WHAT IS THE BATTLE OF SOULS CARD GAME?. 3

GETTING STARTED.. 4

Things you need to start a battle. 4

THE GAME LAYOUT. 5

GAME CARDS. 6

Fighter Cards. 6

WHAT IS A FIGHTER CARD?. 6

FIGHTER CLASSES. 7

EQUIPMENT CARDS ........ 8

TACTIC CARDS .......... 8

BATTLEFIELD CARDS .......... 9

HOW TO PLAY. 10

Time to B.O.S. Battle!. 10

Preparing to battle. 10

Turn Structure. 11

BATTLES AND CHAINS. 13

Fighter Battle Rules. 13

Equipment and Tactic Card Chains. 14

OTHER RULES. 15

GLOSSARY. 17

 

 


 

 

RULE UPDATES

1.       Minimum deck size update: Minimum deck size has been changed from the original 50 cards to 40 cards. Max size hasn’t been changed.

2.       New starting hand rule: Mulligan Rule – On your first draw if you have less than 2 Warrior class fighters in hand, this is considered a mulligan. In which case, you may call a mulligan. You must show your hand then re-shuffle your hand back to your deck and draw another 5 cards. You may only call a mulligan twice per battle. After your second mulligan, you must keep the cards drawn and continue the game. Before the first card is drawn to start the game, all players must agree that they are satisfied with their hand and no longer require a mulligan. **NOTE** If your opponent(s) declare a mulligan but you don’t need it, you may take their mulligan as well, however it will still count towards your 2 (two) mulligan limit.

3.       Battlefield card trigger effects: Battlefield cards that state a cost for an effect to activate can only be triggered by the controlling player not by opponents. Also, unless otherwise stated these triggers may only be activated once per turn.

WHAT IS THE BATTLE OF SOULS CARD GAME?

Battle of Souls is a card game where you take on the role of a supreme commander in a battle for the souls of the battlefield. You command your legion against another player to win the targeted amount of souls.

The starter deck will have all that you need to start playing B.O.S. This is the official rule book of Battle of Souls and it is advised that you read through it before starting to play. Knowing the rules will help you make even more powerful decks in the future.

WIN CONDITIONS

B.O.S. is a game where the objective is to win Soul Points from your opponent. To win a battle, you need to be the first player to have 16000 Soul Points. This is done by doing effect or battle damage to your opponent.


 

GETTING STARTED

Things you need to start a battle

Deck                                                                                      (40 to 80 cards)

Assemble your favorite deck following these rules below:

·         The deck must be 40 to 80 cards

·         You can only have 4 copies of the same card in your deck.

o   For Legendary Warriors there can be no more than 3 Legendary Warriors in your deck. (copies or separate)

Side Deck                                                                             (0 to 15 cards)

This is a separate deck of cards that you can use to change your deck during a match. After each battle in a match, you can swap any card from your side deck with your deck to customize and change strategies against your opponent. The max number of cards you can use in your side deck is 15 cards. The number of cards in your side deck before and after you swap cards should be the same.

Additional items you might need

Coin

Some cards may require the flip of a coin to activate certain effects.

Dice

Some cards have counters as part of their effect. A 6-side die is the best choice for keeping track of these counters, placed on the face up cards that require them.

Other items that can help during a battle

Calculator

SP (Soul Points) will change often during the course of the battle. A calculator is the best way to keep track of your SP.

Smartphone SP App

The Smartphone app will make it easier to track both yours and your opponents’ SP during the battle.

Card Sleeves

Plastic sleeves can prevent your cards from getting bent or scratched. If you use card sleeves they should all be the same so that your cards are not marked.


 

THE GAME LAYOUT

The B.O.S game mat helps you organize your cards during a battle. When you use your cards you place them on the mat. Different kinds of cards are placed in the different zones on the mat.

Each player needs to have their own game mat. The mat is the field for each player. The cards that you control are considered the cards on your side of the field.

You can battle without a mat as long as you remember where to place the cards.

1.       Fighter Zone

This is where you put your fighters when they are played. You can have up to 5 fighters on the field at one time. The fighters placed in this zone are placed in vertical attack position. If a fighter is in horizontal position it is called rest position.

2.       Equipment Zone

This is where you place your equipment cards. Once an equipment card is activated that doesn’t have a continuous effect then it is sent to the discard pile. If there are already 3 equipment cards on your side of the field, you cannot play an additional equipment card. Equipment cards are played face up when you activate them. You can also choose to play a spell card face down. If an equipment card is played face down, you must wait until your next turn to activate it.

2.       Tactic Zone

This is where you place tactic cards. Tactic cards must be first played face down on your side of the field and cannot be activated the same turn they are placed face down. If you already have 3 tactic cards on your side of the field, you cannot place additional tactic cards.

There can be a maximum of 6 Tactic or Equipment cards on the field at one time. (Total of 6 cards, Ex. If the player has 5 face down tactic cards, they are only able to play one more equipment or tactic card on their field)

3.       Discard Pile

When a fighter card is destroyed or whenever an equipment card or tactic card is used they are sent face up to this space. The discard pile is public so either player is able to view the opposing players discard pile at any time during the battle. The order of the cards in the discard pile should not be changed.

4.       Deck Zone

Your deck is placed face-down in this space. Players draw cards from here to their hands. If a card effect requires you to reveal cards from your deck or look through it, shuffle it and put it back in this space after the effect resolves.

5.       Battlefield Zone

There are specific cards called battlefield cards. These cards are placed face up into this zone when activated. There can only be 1 battlefield on the field at a time.  If a player wants to play another battlefield card destroy the one that is currently on the field.

 

GAME CARDS

Fighter Cards

1.       Card Name (Title)

a.       This is the card’s name. If cards have the same name, they are considered to be the same card.

2.       Card Type (Warrior Class)

a.       This is the type of card it is. There are 4 types of fighter cards; Warrior, Elite Warrior, Warlord, and Legendary Warrior.

3.       Set Number

a.       This is a card’s identification number. This number is helpful for collecting and storing your collections.

4.       Atk (Attack Points) / RST (Rest Points)

a.       ATK is the Attack Points that a fighter has. RST is the Rest Points a fighter has.

5.       Card Description

a.       In this section any card effects will be written here. These effects tell the player what the fighter can do and could affect the game in a positive or negative way depending on the effect. Some fighters do not have effects so this area may be blank for them.

WHAT IS A FIGHTER CARD?

Normal Fighters

These are basic fighters. They have no effects to be activated.

Effect Fighters

These are fighters that have special attacks called effects. The effects are split into several categories.

·         Continuous effect

·         Ignition effect

·         Quick Effect

·         Trigger Effect

 

 

Continuous Effect

This effect is active as long as the fighter is on the field. Once the fighter leaves the field then the effect ends.

Ignition Effect

These are effects that can be activated simply by stating that you are activating it. Some of these effects have a cost in order to activate them. These costs might be paying SP, or sacrificing another fighter. These effects can be activated during your first or second main phase. Some effects can be activated during battle phase.

Quick Effect

Some fighters have effects that can be activated during your opponents turn.

Trigger Effect

These are effects that can only be activated during specific times such as during your ready phase, or when a fighter is destroyed.

FIGHTER CLASSES

There are 4 classes of fighter cards.

·         Warrior

·         Elite Warrior

·         Warlord

·         Legendary Warrior

Some of the fighter classes have specific conditions that need to be met in order to deploy them to the field.

Warriors

These are the basic fighters; they require no special requirements to deploy to the field.

Elite Warriors

Elite Warriors or a higher rank Warrior. In order to deploy an Elite Warrior, there is one requirement.

1.       You must sacrifice a warrior class on your side of the field that has at least 3 kill tokens.

Warlord

Warlords are the next highest rank Warrior. In order to deploy a Warlord there is one requirement that must be met.

1.       You must sacrifice an Elite Warrior on your side of the field that has at least 5 kill tokens

Legendary Warrior

These are the highest ranking Warriors as well as the most powerful fighters in the game. There are two requirements for deploying a Legendary Warrior.

1.       You must sacrifice a warrior, an elite warrior, and a warlord from your side of the field.

2.       In addition to the above sacrifice requirements, your warlord must have 7 kill tokens.

There can only be 1 Legendary Warrior on your field at a time. If you want to deploy a second Legendary Warrior the first one must be destroyed in addition to the sacrifice requirements for the new Legendary Warrior. With this in mind, it is wise to plan your deployment strategies well.

EQUIPMENT CARDS

Equipment cards are special cards that can add attack or rest bonuses to your fighters as well as other effects. Equipment cards come in three different types.

1.       One Turn

2.       Continuous

3.       Attached

One-Turn

These are equipment cards that are activated once and then sent to the discard pile after activation. Their effects usually last only during the turn they were activated unless otherwise specified.

Continuous

These are equipment cards that stay on the field after activation until they are destroyed. As long as they are on the field their effect stays in play.

Attached

These are equipment cards that attach to fighter cards. If the fighter card that it is attached to is destroyed and sent to the discard pile, the equipment card is destroyed as well. Much like the continuous cards these stay on the field after activation.

TACTIC CARDS

Tactic cards are another type of special card that have effects that could turn the course of battle. Tactic cards are first played face down on the field and can be activated during your opponent’s turn or any turn after the turn they were first placed on the field. There are two types of Tactic cards.

1.       One Turn

2.       Continuous

One-Turn

Much like one-turn equipment cards, these tactic cards are sent to the discard pile after activation.

Continuous

These are tactic cards that stay on the field after activation, same as continuous equipment cards.  Their effect ends when they are destroyed and sent to the discard pile.

BATTLEFIELD CARDS

These are special cards that can change the battlefield itself. The effects on these cards remain in effect as long as the card is on the field. Some of the battlefield effects are triggered automatically while others are triggered manually by the controlling player. Battlefield cards that state a cost for an effect to activate can only be triggered by the controlling player not by opponents. Also, unless otherwise stated these triggers may only be activated once per turn.


 

HOW TO PLAY

Time to B.O.S. Battle!

How to battle and how to win

A single game is called a battle, and a battle ends when one player wins. There are no draws in B.O.S. Battles are played in a set of 3 which is called a match, the winner of best 2 out of 3 wins the match. (For group play and team battles look under other rules)

Winning a battle

Each player starts a battle with 8000 SP (Soul Points). You win a battle if you are the first to gain 16000 SP or if your opponent is unable to draw a card due to running out of cards in their deck to draw.

(Side note) In a battle royal (more than 2 players), each player starts with 8000 SP and the win condition remains; the first player to reach 16000 SP wins the battle. In a team battle (2v2, 3v3, 4v4 etc.) Each team shares 8000 SP together. Any damage done to any team member reduces the teams SP. The first team to reach 16000 SP is declared the winner. An alternative variation to the team battle SP rules are to split the 8000 SP among the team members. Meaning; 2v2 (both team members get 4000 SP each), 4v4 (each team member gets 2000 SP), 5v5 (each team member gets 1600 SP), or 10v10 (each team member gets 800 SP). If using this alternative SP rules, then 3v3, 6v6, 7v7, 8v8, 9v9 are not possible due to the inability to split the SP evenly.

Preparing to battle

Before starting a battle, follow these 4 steps. Also make sure you have all additional items such as calculator, counters, dice etc. ready as needed.

1.       Shuffle your deck thoroughly. Then shuffle and/or cut your opponent’s deck. (be careful when touching your opponent’s cards)

2.       After cutting, place the decks face down in the proper area on the field.

3.       If the players have a side deck, they each show their side decks and record the number of cards in the deck. Count the number of cards in each side deck (face down) to make sure they are 15 or less cards. If either player swaps cards in their side deck between battles recount the deck to make sure the count is the same.

4.       Decide who will go first by flipping a coin, rolling a dice, or rock-paper-scissors. The winner chooses to either go first or second. If playing a match, the loser of the previous battle can decide if they want to go first or second for the next battle. After this is determined, each player draws 5 cards from their deck. This is your starting hand.

5.       Mulligan Rule – On your first draw if you have less than 2 Warrior class fighters in hand, this is considered a mulligan. In which case, you may call a mulligan. You must show your hand then re-shuffle your hand back to your deck and draw another 5 cards. You may only call a mulligan twice per battle. After your second mulligan, you must keep the cards drawn and continue the game. Before the first card is drawn to start the game, all players must agree that they are satisfied with their hand and no longer require a mulligan. **NOTE** If your opponent(s) declare a mulligan but you don’t need it, you may take their mulligan as well, however it will still count towards your 2 (two) mulligan limit.

Turn Structure

A battle progresses in a series of turns which are divided into different phases

Prepare to battle

1st Player’s turn

1.       Draw Phase

2.       Ready Phase

3.       Main Phase I

4.       Battle Phase

5.       Main Phase II

6.       End Phase

2nd Player’s Turn

Phase Explanation

·         Draw Phase

o   This is the first phase. During this phase, the players whose turn it is draws 1 card from their deck. If a player has no cards remaining in their deck to draw from during this phase, they lose the battle. After you draw, any face down tactic cards can be played before going to the ready phase.

·         Ready Phase

o   Some cards may have effects that activate or costs that you must pay in the ready phase. If you do not have any of these cards on the field you can still activate face down tactic cards during this phase. When you enter ready stage, switch all of your rest position fighters to attack position. Some card effects will either give you a choice to switch positions or prevent you from switching positions. After this step is done you can move to the Main Phase I.

·         Main Phase I

o   This is when you play most of your cards. During this stage you can deploy fighters to the field (max one per turn), activate equipment cards, battlefield cards, or face down tactic cards. Some effects allow you to switch fighters positions during your turn, these effects can be activated during this phase. You can also place face down equipment or tactic cards during this phase.

·         Battle Phase

o   Now it is time to battle with your fighter cards! This phase is divided into several steps. You can choose not to conduct a battle phase every turn. If you choose not to conduct a battle phase, then this phase is skipped and you go straight to Main Phase II or end your turn.

o   IMPORTANT: The player who goes first cannot conduct their battle phase on their first turn. In a team battle, the team that goes first cannot conduct a battle phase. In a battle royal, the person that goes last is the first person able to conduct a battle phase.

o   FLOW OF THE BATTLE PHASE

§  Start Step

§  Battle Step

·         Damage Step

§  End Step

o   The battle phase is split into 4 steps and is conducted in the order shown above. The battle step and damage step are repeated each time you attack with a fighter.

o   Start Step

§  This step starts the battle phase. The turn player should announce “I’m entering the battle phase”

o   Battle Step

§  Select 1 fighter on your side of the field to attack with, and 1 of your opponent’s fighters as your attack target, then declare the attack. If your opponent does not have any fighters on the field, you can attack directly. Play then proceeds to the damage step. Afterwards, the attacking player returns to the battle step and repeats this procedure. Each attack position fighter you control is allowed 1 attack per turn. You do not have to attack with a fighter if you don’t want to.

o   Damage Step

§  In this step the players calculate the result of the battle and whatever damage is done. (See Fighter battle rules) After finishing the damage step return to the battle step.

o   End Step

§  After you’ve resolved all your battles by repeating the battle and damage steps, and have no more fighters you want to attack with, announce to your opponent that you are ending your battle phase.

·         REPLAY

o   After you’ve announced your attacking fighter and the attack target fighter during a battle step, the attack target might be removed from the field or a new fighter may be played onto the opponent’s side of the before the damage step, due to a card’s effect. This causes a “Replay”, when this occurs, you can choose to attack with the same fighter again, or choose to attack with a different fighter, or choose not to attack at all. Note that if you attack with a different fighter, the first fighter is still considered to have declared an attack, and it cannot attack again this turn.

·         Main Phase II

o   If you conducted your battle phase, your turn moves to main phase II afterwards. The actions a player can perform in this phase are the same as main phase I, however, if the player already did something in main phase I that has a limit to the number of times it can be done, the player cannot do it again in main phase II.

·         End Phase

o   Announce the end of your turn, and if there are any cards in the field which say “during the end phase” in their text, resolve those effects in this phase. If you have more than 7 cards in your hand at the end of this phase, select and discard cards to the discard pile until you only have 6 cards in your hand.


 

BATTLES AND CHAINS

Fighter Battle Rules

Damage Step Rules

During the damage step, there are limits on what cards you can activate.

·         Limitations on activating cards

o   During the damage step, you can only activate tactic cards or cards with effects that directly change the fighter’s ATK or RST.

o   Also these cards can only be activated up until the start of damage calculation.

Determining Damage

You calculate battle damage based on the battle position of the fighter you are attacking. If you attack an attack position fighter compare ATK vs. ATK. If you attack a rest position fighter compare your fighter’s ATK vs. the attacked fighter’s RST.

When you attack an Attack Position Fighter

ATK OF ATTACKING FIGHTER VS. ATK OF OPPONENT’S FIGHTER

WIN:      When your attacking fighter’s ATK is higher than the ATK of the opponent’s fighter, the attacking fighter destroys the opponent’s fighter and sends it to the discard pile. The amount that your attacking fighter’s ATK exceeds the ATK of your opponent’s fighter is subtracted from your opponent’s SP as battle damage and added to your own. The attacking fighter receives a kill token as a result of the battle.

TIE:         When your attacking fighter’s ATK is equal to the ATK of the opponent’s fighter, the result is considered a tie, and both fighters are destroyed. Neither player takes any battle damage.

LOSE:     When your attacking fighter’s ATK is lower than the ATK of the opponent’s fighter, the attacking fighter is destroyed and sent to the discard pile. The amount that the opponent’s fighter’s ATK exceeds the ATK of your attacking fighter is subtracted from your SP as battle damage and added to your opponent’s. The defending fighter receives a kill token as a result of the battle.

When you attack a Rest Position Fighter

ATK OF ATTACKING FIGHTER VS. RST OF OPPONENT’S FIGHTER

WIN:     When your attacking fighter’s ATK is higher than the RST of the opponent’s fighter, the attacking fighter destroys the opponent’s fighter and sends it to the discard pile. Neither player takes any battle damage. The attacking fighter receives a kill token as a result of the battle.

TIE:         When your attacking fighter’s ATK is equal to the RST of the opponent’s fighter, neither fighter is destroyed. Neither player takes battle damage.

LOSE:     When your attacking fighter’s ATK is lower than the RST of the opponent’s fighter, neither fighter is destroyed. The amount that the opponent’s fighter’s RST exceeds the ATK of your attacking fighter is subtracted from your SP as battle damage and added to your opponent’s.

 

If your opponent has no fighters

If there are no fighters on your opponent’s side of the field, you can attack directly. The full amount of your attacking fighter’s ATK is subtracted from the opponent’s SP as battle damage, and added to yours. Due to no defending fighter being destroyed, the attacking fighter does not receive a kill token.

Equipment and Tactic Card Chains

Equipment cards can be used prior to the battle phase during Main Phase I or after the battle phase during Main Phase II. During battle phase, you cannot activate any equipment cards.

Tactic cards can be activated during any phase after the turn they were first placed on the field. During the battle phase, after a player declares an attack, the either player can activate a tactic card in response to the attack. This creates a chain. All chains are resolved starting with the last card played in the chain and working backwards.

EXAMPLE:

1.       Turn player attacks with Korki Naomasa for 2100 ATK Damage

2.       Opponent activates their face down tactic card Hoen to reduce the ATK value by 500

3.       Turn player responds by activating Kanabo tactic card to negate Hoen

Kanabo negates the activation of Hoen

Hoen’s activation is negated so the effect doesn’t go through

Opponent takes 2100 ATK damage.


 

OTHER RULES

Fighter Tokens

Fighter tokens are fighters that appear on the field as the result of a card’s effect. They are not included in the deck, and cannot be sent anywhere other than the field, such as the hand or the discard pile. When a token is destroyed or returned to the hand or deck, they are simply removed from the field instead.

You can use token cards or use coins, card sleeves, or any similar marker (as long as it can indicate attack position or rest position) as fighter tokens and play them in fighter zones. Each fighter token takes up 1 of your 5 fighter zones.

Kill Tokens

Kill tokens are token markers used to signify how many kills a fighter has made. Whenever two fighters battle, the winner of the battle receives a kill token. If a fighter that has 1 or more kill tokens on it is destroyed in battle, those tokens are discarded.

Kill tokens cannot be moved to different fighters.

Public Knowledge

The number of cards in a player’s hand and Decks, the cards in their discard pile, and each player’s current SP are all public knowledge and both players can verify these things at any time. If asked, you must answer these things to your opponent truthfully. You are allowed to pick up and verify the cards in your opponent’s discard pile but you must ask their permission first. Also you may not change the order of the cards when verifying their discard pile.

If both players conduct actions simultaneously

For cases like “Each player targets 1 fighter.” Where both players resolve an effect simultaneously, the turn player resolves the effect first. In this example, after the turn player makes their selection, the other player makes theirs.

0 ATK fighters

Fighters with 0 ATK cannot destroy anything by battle. If two attack position fighters with 0 ATK battle each other, neither fighter is destroyed.

Rules vs. Card Effects

If there is a discrepancy between the basic rules and a card’s effect, the card effect takes precedence. For example, a fighter can only attack once per turn, but with a card effect, it is possible to attack twice.

Counters

You may need to place these on cards for some card effects. You cannot place counters unless a card effect allows it. Cards may have effects that change with the number of counters on them, or require you to remove counters as a cost. Some counters have specific names, such as “Spell Counter” or “Clock Counter” Other than their names, each individual counter itself does not have any effects.

Actions which cannot be chained to

You can only create a chain by responding to the activation of a card or effect. Deploying a fighter, tributing, changing a fighter’s battle position, and paying costs are not effect activations and therefore you cannot respond to those actions using chains.

Leaves the Field

Some fighters have effects that activate when they “leave the field” For example, these effects activate when the fighter is sent to the discard pile, remove from play, or returned to the hand. When a fighter on the field is shuffled into the main deck, it is no longer a card on the field, however its effects that activate when it “leaves the field” will not activate.

BATTLE ROYAL SPECIAL RULES (3+ PLAYERS FREE FOR ALL)

In a battle royal group game some deployment rules and damage rules are altered in order to maintain a balanced field.

Damage Rules

When an effect deals damage to your opponent. Each opponent would be dealt damage and the player that activated the effect would gain SP combined for all damage done to each player. For example:

In a 4 person battle royal, turn player activates 2nd effect of Pyramid of the Moon Battlefield Card; Sacrifice an Aztec Warrior to deal 500 damage to your opponent’s SP.

Each of the other three players would be dealt 500 damage. Turn player would then gain 1500 SP.

When a player activates an effect that causes them to pay SP, each of the other players gain SP for the cost paid. For example:

In a 4 person battle royal, turn player activates 1st effect of Pyramid of the Sun Battlefield Card; Pay 200 SP to deploy 1 additional warrior class per turn.

The turn player would lose 200 SP each of the other three players would gain 200 SP.

In a battle royal game, when one player loses all of their soul points they are eliminated from the game.


 

 

GLOSSARY

ATTACK DIRECTLY

Attacking directly means that a fighter attacks a player instead of attacking a fighter. In this case, the damage to the player will be equal to the fighter’s ATK. Some fighters have an effect that allows them to attack directly even if the opponent controls a fighter.

REMOVED FROM PLAY

Although a card that has been used is normally sent to the discard pile, a card which is removed from play is separated from the field instead. You must return your removed cards so you can use them for the next battle

BATTLE DAMAGE

Battle damage is damage inflicted to a player by an attacking fighter, or by a battle between two fighters. This is different from damage from the effect of an effect fighter, equipment, tactic, or battlefield card.

CARDS ON THE FIELD

When “cards on the field” is written in card text, it means all the cards on the game mat other than the discard pile and deck.

WARRIORS (ALL CLASSES)

When the text “Warriors (all classes)” or simply “fighters” is written in card text, if it doesn’t specify a class/rank of warrior then it means all warrior, elite warrior, warlord, and legendary warrior cards.

CONTROL

A card you control is a card on your side of the field. You are the player that gets to make decisions regarding that card. Your opponent can take control of a card away from you with a card effect. In that case the card is moved to your opponent’s side of the field. However, if your card that is controlled by your opponent is sent to the discard pile, or returned to the hand or deck, it is always returned to the hand deck, or discard pile of the card’s owner.

DESTROY

A card is destroyed when it is sent to the discard pile due to battle between fighters or by effect that destroys a card. A card that is returned from the field to the hand or deck, or that is sent to the discard pile as a cost or sacrifice, is NOT considered destroyed.

DISCARD

Discard means to send a card from your hand to the discard pile. This can happen because of a card effect or by adjusting the number of cards in your hand during the end phase

 

EFFECTS OF CARDS

The effect of a card is the special ability written on it, like the effect of an equipment, tactic, or effect fighter. Costs that are needed to activate an ability are not part of the effect.

KILL COUNTER

Whenever any fighter kills another fighter in battle they receive a kill counter. These counters are necessary for sacrificing lower ranked fighters for higher rank fighters.

ORIGINAL ATK (OR RST)

The original ATK (or RST) is the number of ATK (or RST) points printed on a fighter card. This does not include an increase from an equipment card or other card effect.

PAY A COST

To pay a cost is an action required by a player in order to activate a card, an effect, or to deploy a fighter. Sacrificing to deploy an elite or higher rank fighter is an example of a cost. Other common costs are discarding, paying SP, or removing cards from the game. You have to pay any costs before you declare the activation of the card. Even if the activation of the card is negated, you cannot get a refund of the cost that you have paid.

PIERCING BATTLE DAMAGE

Some fighters can inflict piercing battle damage when they attack a rest position fighter. This means that you inflict damage to your opponent’s SP equal to the difference between the attacking fighter’s ATK and the defending fighters RST.

RANDOM

When an effect says to choose a card randomly, there is no official way of doing so, it is fine as long as neither player has a way of knowing which card is being chosen.

REVEAL

When an effect says to reveal a card, you show it to all players. You may have to reveal a face down card, a card from your hand, or from the top of your deck. Revealing a card does not activate the card. Normally, revealed cards are returned to their original position after being looked at by all players.

SEARCH YOUR DECK

Whenever an effect instructs you to add a card from your deck to your hand, or to make a special deployment of a fighter from your deck, you can pick up your deck and search through it for the appropriate card. You must shuffle your deck after any time you search it and let your opponent shuffle or cut. You cannot activate an effect to search your deck for a card if there are no cards that meet the requirements in your deck.

SEND TO THE DISCARD PILE

A card can be sent to the discard pile in various ways. Destroying a card, discarding a card, and sacrificing a fighter are all actions that send a card to the discard pile and will normally activate “When this card is sent to the discard pile” trigger effects.

SHUFFLE

There is no rule for how to shuffle, but while shuffling you cannot look at the cards you are shuffling, or arrange the cards and then shuffle them.

SACRIFICE (TRIBUTE)

Sacrificing is sending a fighter you control to the discard pile. Sacrificing a fighter is one possible cost for deploying a higher rank fighter that has the required number of kill tokens or activating an effect. A fighter sent to the discard pile by sacrificing is not treated as “destroyed”

 

ENJOY THE BATTLES THAT COME!